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Machine Learning and the Future of Cameras

Machine Learning and the Future of Cameras

Core77

It's the best and worst of times for cameras. Traditional point-and-shoots have certainly seen better days, but in every other definition of a camera, the future is explosive. Cameras are everywhere, and capable of so many different tasks that are far from simply taking a snapshot. All this thanks to computer vision and machine learning, which are explored in depth here In terms of their transformational influence on cameras. Bottom line? The very nature of image capture has changed so much that we may not even want to call them all "cameras" in the future.

Too Matchy-Matchy? Google Lens Now Turns the Whole World Into a Showroom

Too Matchy-Matchy? Google Lens Now Turns the Whole World Into a Showroom

The Independent

No Pixel? No problem. You, too, can start living the seamlessly integrated Google Lens life if you have an Android phone from LGE, Motorola, OnePlus, Nokia and other manufacturers except Samsung. The service is now being integrated directly into the camera app on those phones, which means you can automatically ID what's in the frame—languages, objects, landmarks—just by aiming your camera at it (whereas before you had to go into the Google Assistant app). In addition, new features now include style match, which will identify, say, an item of clothing you like and then offer matching accessories and clothing that you can buy right then and there. Ditto for home décor. It's a boon for consumers, but now that the entire world can be a showroom and an online shop at the same time, beleaguered brick-and-mortar retailers may want to see how to make this work effectively in their aisles, too.

Every Royal Wedding Guest Face-Recognized and -Tagged For Your Perusal

Every Royal Wedding Guest Face-Recognized and -Tagged For Your Perusal

Computerworld

If you were wondering who the majority of non-tabloid-prevalent guests at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding this past weekend were, have no fear. Sky News and Amazon Web Services (AWS) teamed up to automatically identify every single guest at the wedding. Cameras snapped images of each guest as they entered St. George's Chapel. The images were then sent to the cloud, where they were ID'd using Amazon Rekognition's computer vision service and then tagged with bio information from the GrayMeta data analysis platform. The final result is Sky News Who's Who, which lets viewers (or journalists trying to identify wedding guests) jump automatically to the entrance footage of any guest (as well as read up on who that guest is). It's a cool and comprehensive offering that makes quick work of video analysis of major event attendees, though it may not be available anymore after May 25, when Europe's sweeping data privacy GDPR law kicks in.

Even Ferris Bueller Can’t Avoid This Face Recognition System

Even Ferris Bueller Can’t Avoid This Face Recognition System

Gizmodo

Not a day goes by when some new use for facial recognition pops up in China. The latest will have boring teachers and distracted or moody students contending with AI. The Hangzhou Number 11 High School in eastern Zhejiang has installed a facial recognition system that scans students every 30 seconds to see if they're paying attention in class or if they're exhibiting moods from sad and happy to afraid and angry. Teachers, meanwhile, can use the information to not only analyze their classroom style in terms of keeping specific students engaged, but also to know when a pupil might be sick or distressed in some other way. The program has raised privacy concerns, even in China, but it's not too hard to see how this kind of technology might make its way into live performance venues for market research or even corporate presentations for employee evaluation and feedback. Regardless, it should at least eliminate the need for teachers to interject "Anyone, anyone?" every other sentence of their lectures.

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How Computer Vision Is Transforming Media

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COMPUTER VISION 2017: THE YEAR IN REVIEW

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The AI-Human Collaboration at Work: Q&A With Albert Technologies CTO Tomer Naveh

The AI-Human Collaboration at Work: Q&A With Albert Technologies CTO Tomer Naveh

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Want to Learn About AI? Follow These 5 Robotic YouTube Stars

Want to Learn About AI? Follow These 5 Robotic YouTube Stars

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The Interactive Guide to Teaching Machines to See the Way We Do

The Interactive Guide to Teaching Machines to See the Way We Do

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Eight Times Computer Vision Hilariously Failed

Eight Times Computer Vision Hilariously Failed

#FAIL

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